Guide to MoMA PS1

Gillian Osswald

An abandoned public school lends both a name and a building to one of the country’s largest and oldest contemporary art institutions. Queens’ MoMA PS1, the Long Island City affiliate of Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art, transformed the space with site-specific installations exhibited throughout the classrooms, beginning with the inaugural 1976 group show, Rooms. Since then, the museum has continued to display art with an adventurous, transformative spirit while playing off its site’s origins. Stroll through classroom-size galleries and stairwells that have been converted into art spaces. The schoolhouse vibe even extends to the restaurant, which resembles a cafeteria, although patrons should expect elevated Quebecois cuisine from chef Hugue Dufour.

Instead of housing a permanent collection, the museum acts as an exhibition space, hosting an ever-changing array of works from experimental and emerging artists, in addition to a series of long-term installations. The variable contents of the galleries, as well as a rotating program of special events, make for a dynamic museum experience. Here’s what you need to know to get the most out of your visit.

How to Get There
E, M train to Court Square-23rd Street; G to Court Square or 21st Street-Jackson Avenue; 7 to Court Square

Address
22-25 Jackson Ave. (between 46th Ave. and 46th Rd.), Long Island City, Queens

Hours
Thursday–Monday, noon to 6pm

Admission
$10 for adults; $5 for students and seniors; free for kids under 16 and (until October 15, 2017) NYC residents

James Turrell: Meeting. Photo: Tagger Yancey IV

Highlights: Long-Term Installations

Fifteen installations are integrated throughout the museum, expanding upon the building’s original architecture. One of the most notable is James Turrell’s Meeting. This “skyspace,” which was commissioned in 1976, centers around a cut-out in the ceiling of an old classroom that reveals the sky above. The lighting system in the room enhances evening viewings, as it is synchronized with the sunset.

Sol LeWitt’s Crayola Square is a crayon drawing that recreates his contribution to the Brooklyn Bridge Event—the first exhibition by the Institute for Art and Urban Resources, as MoMA PS1 was initially known. The piece stands out not only for its dark color against a cinderblock wall but also for its location in a small basement alcove that makes viewing it feel a bit like uncovering a secret.

Saul Melman: Central Governor. Photo: Tagger Yancey IV

Central Governor, by Saul Melman, is also tucked away in the basement boiler room of the museum. The artist created this striking work by applying gold leaf to the building’s 112-year-old original furnace. A small section of the pipes and boiler, though, are only partially covered in gold, suggesting that even this monolithic object could be active, its transformation unfinished.

Ernesto Caivano: In The Woods. Photo: Tagger Yancey IV

Heading up the stairways of the museum is more than a functional move; it’s a reminder that the art here doesn’t always play by the rules. Four of the museums site-specific installations spill into the stairwells, including Cecily Brown’s Untitled, Abigail Lazkoz’ Cameraman and Stair Procession, by William Kentridge. Ernesto Caivano’s In the Woods covers Stairwell A with trees painted in black that climb the walls alongside the viewer.

Ian Cheng: Emissary in the Squat of Gods (live simulation and story, infinite duration, 2015)

Highlights: Temporary Exhibitions

These exhibitions are the current stars of PS1’s galleries, but they aren’t permanent. Explore them before they’re gone. 

May
24

Museums & Galleries
Apollo 11: First Steps Edition

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May
24

Museums & Galleries
Apollo 11

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May
24

Museums & Galleries
Intrepid Museum Celebrates Apollo

summer long celebration of Apollo 11

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May
24

LGBTQ
Poet of the Body: New York's Walt Whitman

"Poet of the Body: New York's Whitman" is a free exhibit at The Grolier Club that celebrates the 200th birthday of the luminary poet Walt Whitman. The exhibit has multiple editions of his famous tome "Leaves of Grass" along with personal items of Whitman's, like the author's pen. Visitors can also take a virtual walk in Whitman's shoes via an interactive 3D stroll down Broadway in the mid-1800s.

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May
24

Museums & Galleries
Audubon Mural Project

Murals in Harlem honoring John James Audubon shine a light on endangered birds.

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May
24

Broadway
Burn This

Lanford Wilson’s play surveys relationships and the raw attraction between two people.

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May
25

Museums & Galleries
Salvation by the Sea

This exhibit examines Coney Island’s role in providing a new life for European immigrants.

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May
29

LGBTQ
Pride For All Launch Party at Bloomingdale's

Bloomingdale’s kicks off its Pride For All celebration with a party for their popup store carrying an array of designer items in all colors of the rainbow. Out magazine editor Phillip Picardi will host this event inspired by NYC's famed LGBTQ+ nightlife scene. This special in-store party at the flagship store on 59th Street will feature dance classics and popsicle cocktails. The popup store will be open through the end of June, with additional events happening throughout Pride month.

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May
31

LGBTQ
Queer History Walks

Commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and dive into queer history with The Whitney Museum of American Art’s free walking tour of the Meatpacking District. This look into the neighborhood's LGBTQ+ past takes place on every Friday in June and then select Fridays throughout the summer.

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Jun
1

LGBTQ
Pride 2019 at House of Yes

The House of Yes in Brooklyn presents a month of Pride-related events for the LGBTQ+ community.

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Jun
1

LGBTQ
Walt Whitman and New York Symposium

Head to The Grolier Club to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman with this free symposium of lectures and presentations on the luminary poet. This day-long event is the culmination of International Whitman Week, with various events happening across New York from from May 27 through June 1; their website has all the details. http://waltwhitmaninitiative.org/international-whitman-week-2019/ Also, while there, you can visit the museum’s special Whitman exhibit “Poet of the Body,” running through July 27.

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Jun
2

LGBTQ
LasReinas Official Queens Pride LGBTQ+ Afterparty

After the festivities of Queens Pride, checkout the official afterparty—the “#1 Rated Woman’s Party”—at the Kabu Lounge in Jackson Heights from 4pm-2am. Expect performances and music by many of NYCs talented female DJs, singers and dancers.

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M. Wells Dinette. Photo: Jesse Winter

What else?

To fuel your exploration at the museum, be sure to stop in M. Wells Dinette. This eatery is styled like a pared-down school cafeteria and specializes in food almost as adventurous as the art. The menu changes regularly, but expect to encounter items like braised tripe and a steak tartare sandwich.

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Photo: Loren Wohl

MoMA PS1’s annual concert series, Warm Up, complements the gallery experience by holding shows within the outdoor sculpture garden. The series, like the museum itself, is committed to featuring innovative and up-and-coming artists. Hear acts like ASAP Ferg, Jackmaster and Actress on Saturdays (3pm) from July 1 to September 2.


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