NYC - The Official Guide

Mind-Blowing Facts About the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree

Andrew Rosenberg
Updated 11/06/2019
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The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree acts each holiday season as a luminous magnet for camera-toting visitors. It towers above the ice-skating rink, with the golden statue Prometheus near its apron, carrying on a custom as old as Rockefeller Center itself—starting back in the early 1930s when the Midtown complex was still under construction. 

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The folks at Rock Center accept submissions each year. What do they look for in a specimen? A nicely shaped Norway spruce, typically at least 75 feet tall and dense enough that you “shouldn’t be able to see the sky through it,” according to head gardener Erik Pauze. Being from the tristate area generally helps—long distance is a consideration, but it’s not a deal breaker (1998’s tree was flown in from Ohio, and there was one from Canada way back when). The selection process takes a while, during which time the winner generally makes itself known. As Pauze says, “Sometimes I visit a tree several times over the year, [to] watch it grow or fill out. But when I see the perfect one, I just know it.”

Rockefeller Christmas Tree NYC Courtesy, Diane Bondareff/Invision for Tishman Speyer/AP Images

Come early December, Today show personalities including Savannah Guthrie and Al Roker will join a host of performers (John Legend and Idina Menzel are among those who will appear) for the opening ceremonies. The tree stays lit—and available for public viewing, selfies and Instagram posts—until mid-January. A Daniel Libeskind–designed Swarovski star tops the tree.

Pining for more info? We’ll go out on a limb and guess you are. Here’s some tree trivia to keep you waxing botanic through the holiday season.

This year’s model

Height: 77 feet
Weight: 14 tons (approximately)
Species: Norway spruce
Hometown: Florida, New York
Age: 70–75 years old
Date felled: November 7, 2019
Date put in place: November 9, 2019
Date of tree lighting: December 4, 2019
Up until: January 17, 2020
Number of lights: 50,000+
Average number of expected daily viewers during holiday season: 750,000 

Rockefeller Christmas Tree 1931 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, 1931. Courtesy, Tishman Speyer

Through the years

1931 First Christmas tree on the grounds, put up by construction workers
1933 First official year of Rockefeller Center Christmas tree
1941 Four reindeer, in pens, flank the tree; later, they move to the Bronx Zoo
1942–44 Tree goes unlit due to World War II
1949 The tree is painted silver, ostensibly to make it look more wintry
1966 A white spruce hailing from Canada becomes the first tree from outside the US
1981 Last time a species other than a Norway spruce (in this case, another white spruce) is chosen
1997 Tree from Stony Point, NY, is transported by barge down the Hudson River
1999 Tallest tree ever, at 100 feet
2016 Tony Bennett, at the age of 90, performs at the ceremony for the fourth time in seven years (he performed again in 2018)

Swarovski-crystal star. Photo: Adam Kuban

Fast facts

* Why a Norway spruce? Our research indicates that its characteristics of a straight trunk and the ability to resist wind make it a sturdy choice; and its size, on average between 80 and 100 feet at full maturity, matches Rockefeller Center’s height requirements.  
* For the most part, the same LED lights, which were first introduced in 2007, are used each year (though their total number has grown from around 30,000 to more than 50,000).
* The Swarovski-crystal star that tops the tree first appeared in 2004—and was reimagined by architect Daniel Libeskind for 2018. The new version has 3 million crystals, 70 glass spikes and, with a brightness of 106,000 lumens, may be powerful enough to turn night into day
* Those in charge maintain the tree with regular watering—as it’s outside, it retains its freshness better than it would in a house or apartment.
* The inaugural tree lighting was broadcast on radio in 1933; 18 years later it made its televised debut on the Kate Smith Evening Hour
* After the tree is done spreading holiday cheer, it’s sent on its merry way to be used as lumber for Habitat for Humanity.

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