NYC - The Official Guide

9/11 Memorial & Museum

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The National September 11 Memorial and Museum remembers and honors those killed in the terrorist attacks of 9/11/2001 and 2/26/1993, those who risked their lives to save others, and all who demonstrated extraordinary compassion in the aftermath through commemoration, exhibitions and educational programs. The memorial consists of two reflecting pools set in the footprints of the Twin Towers, with names of the victims inscribed in bronze around the pools. The museum serves as the principal institution concerned with exploring the implications of the events of 9/11, documenting their impact and exploring 9/11's continuing significance.

World Trade Center (museum: 180 Greenwich St.)
Manhattan, NY 10007
  (212) 266-5211

NYC and Company Member

Attractions
Historic Sites & Landmarks
Buildings & Skyscrapers
Historic Sites
Statues, Monuments & Memorials
Museums and Galleries
Culture & History
History
New York History
Accessibility
Assistive Listening System
Braille
Large Print
Open and/or Closed Captioned
Sign Language Interpretation
Wheelchair Accessible
Internet
WiFi Available
Services
Senior/Student Discounts

Do I need a ticket? You do not need a ticket to gain access to the 9/11 Memorial, though a ticket is required for museum admission, which also requires visitors to go through a security check. You can buy tickets in advance at 911memorial.org.

Can I take a tour? The museum offers packages that grant you admission along with a tour of the museum or the memorial. Visit 911memorial.org. You can also just join one of the 45-minute walking tours of the memorial itself. And the 9/11 Tribute Center runs tours that cover the memorial and are given by guides who witnessed or survived the attacks; for more information, visit tributewtcc.org.

Who designed the memorial? The memorial was designed by architect Michael Arad in collaboration with landscape architect Peter Walker. Arad’s design was selected from more than 5,000 proposals for the site. The architect, who lived in the East Village in 2001, witnessed the second plane hitting the World Trade Center’s south tower.


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