NYC - The Official Guide

The Met Cloisters

{{main.items.length}} photos
{{main.items.length}} photos
Advertisement

Discover the wonders of medieval Europe through the art, architecture, and gardens found at The Met Cloisters. Enjoy unparalleled views of the Hudson River, stroll through enchanting gardens and see masterpieces of medieval sculpture, stained glass, tapestries and more. The Met presents over 5,000 years of art from every corner of the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. Beside The Met Cloisters, the Museum lives in two other iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Breuer.

99 Margaret Corbin Dr. in Fort Tryon Park
Manhattan, NY 10040
  (212) 923-3700

Attractions
Parks & Gardens
Museums and Galleries
Art Galleries
Culture & History
Museums
Accessibility
Assistive Listening System
Braille
Large Print
Sign Language Interpretation
Wheelchair Accessible
Internet
WiFi Available
Miscellaneous
Kid Friendly
Services
Senior/Student Discounts

How much are tickets? Admission to the Met is pay-what-you-wish at the door and includes same-day access to the Met Fifth Avenue, the Met Cloisters and the Met Breuer. Tickets can also be purchased in advance online at the suggested donation of $25 for adults, $17 for seniors (65 and over), $12 for students. Note: as of March 1, 2018, the Met’s admission policy will change. Access to the museum will be pay-what-you-wish at the door for New York State residents, as well as students from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Visitors from outside New York State will be required to pay a fixed fee ($25 for adults, $17 for seniors 65 and over, $12 for students), while admission for children under 12 will remain free. Full-priced tickets will allow access for three consecutive days to each of the museum’s three locations: the Met, the Met Breuer and the Met Cloisters.

Is the Met Cloisters a medieval structure? Not exactly. First built in 1914, the Met Cloisters is an amalgamation and imitation of 12th–15th century architecture and landscaping. In 1958 the museum added a limestone apse from a 12th-century Spanish church, lending some additional authenticity.

What’s special about the Met Cloister’s gardens? The landscape features plants—curated from medieval texts—that were commonly grown in the Middle Ages.

Is there anything else I can do while I’m up there? You can hang around Fort Tryon Park, view the nearby George Washington Bridge and Hudson River, or eat and drink at the New Leaf Restaurant & Bar and the sand-scaped La Marina.

Get Your Tickets

The Met Cloisters


Advertisement

Social Media

From Our Partners